Academic Catalog

Digital Humanities & Societies (DHS)

DHS 621  Approaches to Digital Humanities  3 Credits  
Grade Mode: Standard Letter, Audit/Non Audit  
  
This course prepares students to develop a broad understanding of the theories, concepts, debates and impacts of digital culture. The course reflects the emerging discourses of digital humanities (incl. heritage). Students will be introduced to key debates and contemporary issues. The course will also expand the theory to the exploration of the concrete impact of the digitization onto different dimensions and sectors of society such as, but not limited to: women, e-health, online media and music, data, literature, etc.
DHS 622  Digital Communication and Media  3 Credits  
Grade Mode: Standard Letter, Audit/Non Audit  
  
Digital communication has transformed many aspects of representation and broadcasting, challenging existing roles, methodologies and practices of the media industry. This course will examine both theoretical and practical aspects of digital media and communication. Through real-life examples and case studies focusing on the Middle East, students will explore the impact of user-generated content and social media, the role of digital cultures in political transformations, the effect of mass digitization, and challenges in digital publishing.
DHS 623  Methods in Digital Humanities  3 Credits  
Grade Mode: Standard Letter, Audit/Non Audit  
  
Designed like an independent study, this course supports students in their endeavor to conduct research in the field of Digital Humanities. Students can produce a research-based thesis or a project-based thesis of up to 15,000 words or equivalent. The thesis should showcase the student's ability to collect/assess data, build an argument; and critically apply the main theories in their area of study. The thesis is an opportunity for students to gain the requisite skills necessary for writing a publishable article.
DHS 651  Emerging Technologies and Applications  3 Credits  
Grade Mode: Standard Letter, Audit/Non Audit  
  
There is now widespread recognition that digital technologies have profoundly changed the way we produce content, share information, interact with each other’s, develop and commercialize products and services, create knowledge or financial value, while defining new environments for these functions to flourish. The course discovers how political, social, economic, financial powers and knowledge are reshaped in our contemporary digital era. The course introduces students to the need of digitalization, continuously developing platforms and the fundamental knowledge of emerging new realities.
DHS 652  Digital Publishing and Design  3 Credits  
Grade Mode: Standard Letter, Audit/Non Audit  
  
This course provides students with a comprehensive foundation of layout and design principles to integrate digital media essential for effective print-based and web based business publications. The students will learn the graphic terminology, type specification, and evolution of the printed piece from concept to final printed project. An overview of the industry standard software will be introduced to understand the basics of web pages creation, page layout and design and various methods of reproduction for print and electronic delivery.
DHS 654  Civil Society and Digital Activism  3 Credits  
Grade Mode: Standard Letter, Audit/Non Audit  
  
This course aims to study how the ‘cyberspace’ theory and ‘new media’ have empowered societies to impose change and development on regional or global scales in a variety of domains. The course introduces the students to the effective role of social media ranging from websites, social networking apps, and collaborative platforms to promote and state positions toward theoretical fields, such as: empowerment of minorities, racism, feminism, global crises, climate and environmental change, emerging industries, peer-to-peer production, urbanism, and self-development.
DHS 655  Exploring Digital Heritage Methods  3 Credits  
Grade Mode: Standard Letter, Audit/Non Audit  
  
This course addresses the needs of a growing cultural heritage industry; it provides opportunities to develop skills in which the material or tangible objects and digital culture relate. The course focuses on a wide spectrum of topics, starting with archaeology, arts, museum collections, historical data archiving, and built heritage. This course explores the techniques of how the tangible heritage is represented, transmitted and perceived in the digital world
DHS 656  Introduction to Human Language Technologies  3 Credits  
Grade Mode: Standard Letter, Audit/Non Audit  
  
This course is an introduction to the most important problems involved in Human Language Technologies (HLT) with a focus on the Arabic language. We will present the techniques and resources used and the theories they are based on. The course includes an overview of Natural Language applications. We will also explore the relationship between language and technology including language learning and speech technologies. Topics include machine translation, automatic speech recognition and generation, dialog systems as well as language technologies
DHS 657  Coding for Humanities  3 Credits  
Grade Mode: Standard Letter, Audit/Non Audit  
  
This course will provide students the technical skills necessary to conduct quantitative research in digital humanities and societies. In particular, this course will introduce students to the basic coding skills needed to be considered in any professional career nowadays. As an introductory programming course, we will introduce common practices to extract and collect raw data from a variety of digital sources, to organize, clean, explore, analyze, visualize and interpret such data, and to infer sensible information and draw conclusions
DHS 658  Digital Resources in the Humanities  3 Credits  
Grade Mode: Standard Letter, Audit/Non Audit  
  
This course explores a broad spectrum of perspectives on the digital humanities engage with a variety of digital humanities tools in order to choose the most appropriate technology to facilitate different work in different situations in order to develop familiarity with a range of digital humanities projects, as well as the ability to evaluate the tools and methods involved in creating those projects and become more thoughtful.
DHS 659  Digital Innovation and Transformation  3 Credits  
Grade Mode: Standard Letter, Audit/Non Audit  
  
This course provides analytical tools and frameworks to help students gaining a sound understanding of the potential and place of new developments and knowledge production in social media and digital industries. Students will appreciate the importance of innovation as a target and the way knowledge management will contribute to this innovation. Students will see knowledge as a commodity and how this commodity can be managed
DHS 660  Digital Disinformation and Propaganda in the Middle East and North Africa  3 Credits  
Grade Mode: Standard Letter, Audit/Non Audit  
  
This module combines practical and academic skills for students with no prior knowledge of the region to engage with contemporary debate on the ideas of digital propaganda, PR, and surveillance. It is designed for those interested in being able to tackle concerns about fake news, media distortions, and information hegemony in both the Middle East and the wider global context. The course consists of lectures, class discussions/seminars and student presentations. The module is suitable for interdisciplinary pathways, and incorporate current debates in both media and politics
DHS 661  Digital Writing  3 Credits  
Grade Mode: Standard Letter  
  
The course is called “Digital Writing” because it will employ state of the art technology that allows students to investigate their writing patterns in terms of topical structure and the various textural gestures (stance, sentiment, emotion, mood, register cues, genres cues) writers can use to embellish the topical structure.
DHS 669  Independent Research Project  3 Credits  
Grade Mode: Pass/Non Pass  
  
The Digital Humanities and Societies program requires students to either undertake an internship or an independent research project. This course allows students to explore their specific research interests within a relative field through a research agenda. The student will work closely with academic advisor and supervisor to implement this project within a given time period. The project may be capitalized on for the purposes of the thesis.
DHS 691  Internship  3 Credits  
Grade Mode: Pass/Non Pass  
  
The Digital Humanities and Societies program requires students to either undertake an internship or an independent research project. This course allows students to explore their specific research interests within a relative field through a research agenda. The student will work closely with academic advisor and supervisor to implement this project within a given time period. The project may be capitalized on for the purposes of the thesis.
DHS 695  Master's Thesis Hours  0-6 Credits  
Grade Mode: Pass/Non Pass  
  
Designed like an independent study, this course supports students in their endeavor to conduct research in the field of Digital Humanities. Students can produce a research-based thesis or a project-based thesis of up to 15,000 words or equivalent. The thesis should showcase the student's ability to collect/assess data, build an argument; and critically apply the main theories in their area of study. The thesis is an opportunity for students to gain the requisite skills necessary for writing a publishable article.